For more information regarding the curriculum please contact: admin@blaconhigh.cheshire.sch.uk

Head of Department: Mrs E Owens

History Teacher: Mr A Carr (Assistant Deputy Headteacher)
History Teacher: Mrs F Prime

HALF TERM 1

Introductory Lesson 1 - What is a timeline?

Introductory Lesson 2 - What are ' time words' and how to use them e.g. decade, century, millennium, A.D and B.C.

Lesson 3 onwards: Demonstrate knowledge of how Chester has changed over time, describing its features.

L1 - Introduction to modern Chester

L2 - Romans in Chester

L3  - Middle Ages in Chester

L4  - Tudors in Chester

L5  - Stuarts in Chester

L6  - World War II in Chester

L7  - Assessment

L8  - Assessment feedback

L9  - ‘Through time’ study pt 1 (Crime & Punishment)

L10  -'Through time’ study pt 2

 

Students place events in the correct chronological order using the dates provided.

Students demonstrate knowledge of how Chester has changed over time, describing its features.

HALF TERM 2

Students will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1066-1500. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

 

The Middle Ages - Part A - Kings & Power (The Norman Conquest - includes Assessment and feedback*)

L1 & L2 Who had a claim to the throne in 1066?

L3 & L4 What was the Battle of Hastings?*

L5 What was the Bayeux Tapestry?

L6 What was the Feudal system?

 

The Middle Ages - Part A - Kings & Power (Plantagenets)

L7 Who murdered Thomas Beckett?

L8 Was King John really that bad?

L9 Who were the Princes in the tower?

L10 Revision activities and test

HALF TERM 3

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1066-1500. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

 

Britain 1066-1500

The Middle Ages - Part B - Everyday life (includes Assessment and feedback*)

L1 What was it like to live in a Medieval village or town?

L2 What were the symptoms of the Black Death?

L3 Was the Black Death a bad thing for everyone?

L4 & L5 Would you have supported the Peasants’ Revolt?*

L6 What were castles used for?

L7 What was the Domesday book and why was it significant?

L8 How did the church control society in the Medieval period?

L9 Revision activities and test

HALF TERM 4

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1500-1558. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.                Britain 1500-1603 - The Tudors                                                                                                                                                                                                            L1 Henry VII problems

L2 Catholic Vs. Protestant

L3 & L4 Why did Henry become Head of the Church of England/solutions

L5 Wives

L6 Dissolution of the monasteries

L7 Assessment

L8 Assessment Feedback

L9 Boy King & Nine Day Queen

L10 Revision activities and test

HALF TERM 5

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1558-1603. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.                Britain 1500-1603 - The Tudors                                                                                                                                                                                    L1 Bloody Mary

L2 Elizabeth I’s portraits

L3 Elizabeth image (assessment)

L4 Mary Queen of Scots

L5 & L6 Armada and assessment

L7 Assessment feedback

L8 Mughals

L9 Mughals

HALF TERM 6

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1603-1688. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

 

Britain 1603-1688 - The Stuarts

L1 Who was King James I?

L2 Why did Guy Fawkes try to blow up Parliament?

L3 What were the causes of the English Civil War?

L4 What sides were there in the English Civil War?

L5 What was the New Model Army?

L6 What can we learn from paintings about Charles' execution?

L7 - L9 Who was Cromwell?

L10 Assessment

L11 Assessment feedback / review

HALF TERM 1

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain 1750-1900. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

 

1750 - 1900 The Industrial Revolution in England and Wales

L1 & L2 What was the Industrial Revolution?

L3 & L4 Why was there an Industrial Revolution?

L5 & L6 What was it like to work in factories (child labour)?

L7 Why were the Chartists unsuccessful?

L8 How healthy were the Victorians?

L9 How did Victorians prefer to travel?

HALF TERM 2

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain and worldwide from c1700s. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

1750 - 1900 Britain & The Wider World: Empire

L1 & L2 What was the transatlantic slave trade?

L3 How were slaves treated?

L4 & L5 What was life like on a plantation?

L6 Why did Britain want an Empire?

L7 & L8 What was the impact of the Empire at home and abroad?

L9 & L10 How did slavery end?

HALF TERM 3

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in modern Britain since 1901. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

20th Century - Making of the Modern World

L1 & L2 & L3 Why did WWI start in 1914?

L4 What made men sign up to join the army during WWI?

L5 & L6 What was Trench warfare and what was it like to live in the trenches?

L7 Who were conscientious objectors?

L8 & L9 Why was the Battle of the Somme significant? / Remembrance activities

HALF TERM 4

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand events in Britain since 1901. They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

L1 & L2 What role did women play in WWI?

L3 & L4 Who were the Suffragists and Suffragettes?

L5 & L6 What was Appeasement and how did it lead to WWII?

L7 - L10 What was life like on the Homefront?

HALF TERM 5

Pupils will study interpretations of the past and use primary sources to understand the specific nature of the Holocaust (Shoah). They will be able to identify and describe key features, develop arguments to explain and analyse the impact and significance of key people and changes.

20th Century - The Holocaust

L1 - L3 How did the experiences of Jews living in Germany change between 1919 & 1945?

L4 - L6 What was life like for Jews living in the Warsaw ghetto between 1939 & 1945?

L7 Why did so few people survive the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp?

L8 - L10 Perpetrators, Bystanders and Resistors: How we should remember the Holocaust

HALF TERM 6

Additional Post WWII events and lessons:

L1 - L3 Srebrenica

L4 - L7 9/11 and the War on Terror

L8 - L10 Immigration and Diversity – The Windrush generation and the Notting Hill spirit

HALF TERM 1

This option focuses on the key trends and turning points that have affected the development of the USA between 1929 and 2000. Candidates will be required to consider the developments, events and personalities which have shaped the recent history of the USA. Candidates will be required to examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have affected the lives of the American people over the whole of this period.  Economic downturn and recovery how was the USA affected by the Great Depression between 1929 and 1945? The impact of the Wall St. Crash; Republican attempts to deal with the crisis; life during the Depression; Roosevelt and the New Deal  The economic impact of the Second World War and post-war developments  How had the economy of the USA changed by the 1960s?  Industrial output; post-war affluence; consumerism and suburbanization; `poverty amidst plenty`

HALF TERM 2

This option focuses on the key trends and turning points that have affected the development of the USA between 1929 and 2000. Candidates will be required to consider the developments, events and personalities which have shaped the recent history of the USA. Candidates will be required to examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have affected the lives of the American people over the whole of this period.  The issue of Civil Rights 1941 - 1970 Why was it difficult for black Americans to gain equal rights between 1941 and 1970? The contribution of black Americans to the war effort; the issue of education –Brown vs Topeka, Little Rock High; Montgomery Bus Boycott; the roles of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X; Civil Rights legislation

Political change 1960-2000 What were the main political developments in the USA between 1960 and 2000?

The domestic policies of Kennedy; Nixon and Watergate; the Reagan Years; changes under Bush Senior and Clinton.  Social change 1950-2000 How did American society change between 1950 and 2000? Changes in music, entertainment, media and literature; changes in youth culture and student protest; the changing role of women.

HALF TERM 3

This option focuses on the key trends and turning points that have affected the development of the USA between 1929 and 2000. Candidates will be required to consider the developments, events and personalities which have shaped the recent history of the USA.

Students will examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have affected the lives of the American people over the whole of this period.  Cold War rivalry why did relations between the USA and the USSR deteriorate between 1945 and 1973? The Truman Doctrine and containment of Communism; Berlin Crisis 1948-49; Cuban Missile Crisis; US involvement in Vietnam

The search for world peace since 1970 What has been the USA`s role in the search for peace since 1970 Détente and attempts to limit arms; changing relations with China; changing US relations with the USSR; the fall of Communism and the end of the Cold War; US involvement In Iran, Iraq and the Gulf War.

HALF TERM 4

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of England during the Elizabethan Age, from 1558 to 1603. Pupils will be required to consider the major influences on political and social life during the period as well as the issue of religious controversy. They should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources:

1 Elizabethan government - How successful was the government of Elizabeth I? The coronation and popularity of Elizabeth; Royal Court, Privy Council and councillors; local government; the role of Parliament; taxation and freedom of speech

2 Lifestyles of rich and poor - How did life differ for the rich and poor in Elizabethan times? Contrasting lifestyles of rich and poor; homes and fashion; causes of poverty; issue of unemployment and vagrancy; government legislation including the 1601 Poor Law

3 Popular entertainment what were the most popular types of entertainment in Elizabethan times?

Cruel sports; entertainment enjoyed by the rich; the Elizabethan theatre; design, plays; attitudes towards the theatre.

HALF TERM 5

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of England during the Elizabethan Age, from 1558 to 1603. Pupils will be required to consider the major influences on political and social life during the period as well as the issue of religious controversy. They should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources:

1 The problem of religion how successfully did Elizabeth deal with the problem of religion?

2 The Catholic threat - Why were the Catholics such a serious threat to Elizabeth?

HALF TERM 6

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of England during the Elizabethan Age, from 1558 to 1603. Candidates will be required to consider the major influences on political and social life during the period as well as the issue of religious controversy. Candidates should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources. 1 The Spanish Armada How much of a threat was the Spanish Armada? Reasons for the Armada; war in the Netherlands; course of the Armada – events in the Channel, Calais, ‘fireships’ and return to Spain; results of the Armada. 2 The Puritan threat why did the Puritans become an increasing threat during Elizabeth’s reign? Puritanism; challenge to the Settlement; Puritan opposition in Parliament and Privy Council; measures taken to deal with the Puritan challenge

HALF TERM 1

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of Germany from 1919-1939. Candidates will be required to consider the impact of the First World War on Germany, the recovery of the Weimar Republic, the factors which led to the rise of the Nazis and the impact of the Nazi regime upon the lives of the German people. Candidates should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in Germany in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources.  Impact of the First World War what challenges were faced by the Weimar Republic from 1919-1923?

 

 

 

Impact of Versailles; weaknesses of Weimar government; political instability – Spartacist, Kapp, Munich Putsches; hyperinflation; events in the Ruhr 1923

 

Recovery of Weimar Why were the Stresemann years considered a ‘golden age’?

 

 

Recovery from hyperinflation; Dawes and Young Plans; Locarno Pact; League of Nations; US investment; social and political developments

 

End of the Weimar Republic how and why did the Weimar Republic collapse between 1929 and 1933?

 

 

Social and political impact of the Depression on the Weimar Republic; Hitler’s electoral appeal; role of the SA; propaganda; political extremism and scheming 1929-1932

HALF TERM 2

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of Germany from 1919-1939. Candidates will be required to consider the impact of the First World War on Germany, the recovery of the Weimar Republic, the factors which led to the rise of the Nazis and the impact of the Nazi regime upon the lives of the German people. Candidates should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in Germany in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources.  Consolidation of power How did the Nazis consolidate their power between 1933 and 1934?

 

 

Hitler as Chancellor; Reichstag Fire; 1933 election and Enabling Act; trade unions and political parties; Night of the Long Knives; Hitler becomes Fuhrer

 

Nazi economic, social and racial policy How did Nazi economic, social and racial policy affect life in Germany?

 

 

Reducing unemployment; policy towards workers; women and the Three Ks; controlling education; the Hitler Youth Movement; treatment of the Jews

 

Terror and persuasion What methods did the Nazis use to control Germany?

 

 

Use of SS and Gestapo; control of legal system; Goebbels and propaganda; use of rallies, radio and cinema; censorship of newspapers and the arts

HALF TERM 3

This option focuses in depth on selected themes and issues relating to the history of Germany from 1919-1939. Candidates will be required to consider the impact of the First World War on Germany, the recovery of the Weimar Republic, the factors which led to the rise of the Nazis and the impact of the Nazi regime upon the lives of the German people. Candidates should develop an awareness of how aspects of life in Germany in this period have been represented and interpreted, and how they have generated wider historical debate. They should also address the key questions in each topic area using a range of historical sources.  Hitler’s foreign policy what factors led to the outbreak of war in 1939?

 

Hitler’s foreign policy aims; rearmament and conscription; the Rhineland 1936; Anschluss 1938; Sudetenland 1938; Nazi-Soviet pact 1939

HALF TERM 4

This option focuses thematically on the main trends in the history of health and medicine in Britain from c.500 to the present day. Candidates will be required to consider the causes, treatment and prevention of illness and disease, advances in medical knowledge, developments in patient care and advances in public health and welfare over time. Candidates will also be required to examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have contributed to the development of health and medicine from c.500 to the present day. In this option, centres should ensure that they focus, where appropriate, on the issues of change, continuity, significance and turning points. As part of this option candidates will investigate an historic site connected with this theme. Causes of illness and disease what have been the causes of illness and disease over time?

 

Problems in the medieval era: poverty, famine, warfare: lack of hygiene in the medieval and early modern eras with reference to the Black Death of the fourteenth century and the Great Plague of the seventeenth century; the effects of industrialisation and the incidence of cholera and typhoid in the nineteenth century; the spread of bacterial and viral diseases in the twentieth century

Attempts to prevent illness and disease how effective were attempts to prevent illness and disease over time?

 

Early methods of prevention of disease with reference to the Black Death: alchemy, soothsayers and medieval doctors; the application of science to the prevention of disease in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: the work of Edward Jenner and vaccination; the influence and spread of inoculation since 1800; the discovery of antibodies and developments in the field of bacteriology

Attempts to treat and cure illness and disease how have attempts to treat illness and disease changed over time?

 

Traditional treatments and remedies common in the medieval era: herbal medicines, barber surgeons, use of leeches; James Lister and the use of antiseptics in the later nineteenth century; James Simpson and the development of anaesthetics; twentieth century developments: Marie Curie and the development of radiation; the roles of Fleming, Florey and Chain regarding antibiotics; Barnard and transplant surgery; modern advances in cancer treatment and surgery; alternative treatments advances.

HALF TERM 5

This option focuses thematically on the main trends in the history of health and medicine in Britain from c.500 to the present day. Candidates will be required to consider the causes, treatment and prevention of illness and disease, advances in medical knowledge, developments in patient care and advances in public health and welfare over time. Candidates will also be required to examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have contributed to the development of health and medicine from c.500 to the present day. In this option, centres should ensure that they focus, where appropriate, on the issues of change, continuity, significance and turning points. As part of this option candidates will investigate an historic site connected with this theme. Developments in patient care how has the care of patients improved over time?

 

The role of the church and monasteries from medieval times up to the mid sixteenth century; the roles of voluntary charities in patient care after the mid sixteenth century; science and the development of endowed hospitals in the late eighteenth century; Florence Nightingale and the professionalization of nursing in the nineteenth century; the impact of the early 20th century Liberal reforms; the Beveridge Report of 1944 and provision under the NHS after 1946

Developments in public health and welfare how effective were attempts to improve public health and welfare over time?

 

Public health and hygiene in medieval society; public health and hygiene in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the impact of industrialisation on public health in the nineteenth century; the work of Edwin Chadwick leading to Victorian improvements in public health; efforts to improve housing and pollution in the twentieth century; local and national government attempts to improve public health and welfare in the twenty-first century: campaigns, fitness drives, healthy eating.

HALF TERM 6

This option focuses thematically on the main trends in the history of health and medicine in Britain from c.500 to the present day. Candidates will be required to consider the causes, treatment and prevention of illness and disease, advances in medical knowledge, developments in patient care and advances in public health and welfare over time. Candidates will also be required to examine the major political, social, economic and cultural perspectives which have contributed to the development of health and medicine from c.500 to the present day. In this option, centres should ensure that they focus, where appropriate, on the issues of change, continuity, significance and turning points. As part of this option candidates will investigate an historic site connected with this theme. Advances in medical knowledge how much progress has been made in medical knowledge over time?

Common medical ideas in the medieval era: the influence of alchemy, astrology and the theory of the four humours; the influence of the medical work of Vesalius, Pare and Harvey in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries;  nineteenth century advances in medical knowledge: improved knowledge of the germ theory: Pasteur and Koch; the development of scanning techniques in the twentieth century: X-rays, ultrasound and MRI scans; the discovery of DNA and genetic research in the later twentieth century.  In this turn pupils will also cover the case study released by the exam board up to 3 years prior to the commencement of studies.  This has been but is not exclusively Eyam and WWI Field Hospitals.

HALF TERM 1

Revision - Depth topics - Elizabeth and Germany.  Exam skills - interpretation / source / describe / explain / analyse and evaluate significance

HALF TERM 2

Revision - Depth topics - Elizabeth and Germany.  Exam skills - interpretation / source / describe / explain / analyse and evaluate significance

HALF TERM 3

Revision - Breadth topics - USA and Medicine.  Exam skills - comprehension (Medicine) / describe / explain / analyse and evaluate (including sources - Medicine)

HALF TERM 4

Revision - Breadth topics - USA and Medicine.  Exam skills - comprehension (Medicine) / describe / explain / analyse and evaluate (including sources - Medicine)

HALF TERM 5

HALF TERM 6

Revision ahead of exams.