For more information regarding the curriculum please contact: admin@blaconhigh.cheshire.sch.uk

Head of Department: Miss G McHale

HALF TERM 1

What Makes A Good Song – Riffs, Hooks, Structure, Melody and Accompaniment.  

Learning how popular songs have mass appeal across all age ranges and in a variety of contexts. This unit explores memorable melodies, hooks and riffs; verse, chorus, bridge and middle 8; structures: mood, atmosphere and melodic shapes that reflect the meaning of songs and lyrics. The main focus of this unit is structure. Pupils explore four features that are integral to a good song: the role of riffs, the interaction of lyrics with the music, how the song is put together and the centrality of a memorable melody by performing melodies of popular songs.  

Critical Engagement: identifying riffs, outros, intros and structure, how a song has been put together.  

Composing: creating their own melody and accompaniment for eerie Halloween and Bonfire night music using loops and samples on a sequencer.  

Performing: Exploring melodies and developing keyboard/glockenspiel skills (rhythm and pitch using musical notation) and developing vocal skills. 

HALF TERM 2

What Makes A Good Song - Treble Clef and Keyboard/Glockenspiel Skills 

Learn how to read music by understanding the Treble Clef, note names and basic keyboard skills. The main focus of this short unit is to start using musical vocabulary within lessons and understand staff notation. The unit explores the music elements of pitch and duration and continues the development of keyboard skills performance, focusing on Melody and Accompaniment using staff notation.  

Critical Engagement: Learning songs to familiarise yourself with the new musical vocabulary. Performing: Keyboard skills to develop understanding of pitch and rhythm using staff notation and develop vocal skills.

HALF TERM 3

Making Connections - Learning how improvisation is a common feature of diverse musical traditions and how there is a range of musical features and devices that support improvisation.  

 

Tis unit explores the ways in which improvisation, rhythmic and melodic, has remained a strong feature within a wide range of musical styles, genres and traditions. It also explores some interesting scale patterns through listening, improvising and performing activities. This unit focuses on: pitch (ragas, blues scale, pentatonic scale); rhythm (cycles and loops); and structure (African, Chinese, Indian and Blues structures).  

Performing: improvisation and solo/ensemble performing skills.  

Composing: improvisation and accompaniment within a variety of genres and styles. Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features of improvisation in African, Chinese, Indian and Blues music. 

HALF TERM 4

Making Connections - Learning how improvisation is a common feature of diverse musical traditions and how there is a range of musical features and devices that support improvisation.

  

This unit explores the ways in which improvisation, rhythmic and melodic, has remained a strong feature within a wide range of musical styles, genres and traditions. It also explores some interesting scale patterns through listening, improvising and performing activities. This unit focuses on: pitch (ragas, blues scale, pentatonic scale); rhythm (cycles and loops); and structure (African, Chinese, Indian and Blues structures).  

Performing: improvisation and solo/ensemble performing skills.  

Composing: improvisation and accompaniment within a variety of genres and styles. Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features of improvisation in African, Chinese, Indian and Blues music. 

HALF TERM 5

Making Connections - Learning how improvisation is a common feature of diverse musical traditions and how there is a range of musical features and devices that support improvisation.  

 

This unit explores the ways in which improvisation, rhythmic and melodic, has remained a strong feature within a wide range of musical styles, genres and traditions. It also explores some interesting scale patterns through listening, improvising and performing activities. This unit focuses on: pitch (ragas, blues scale, pentatonic scale); rhythm (cycles and loops); and structure (African, Chinese, Indian and Blues structures).  

Performing: improvisation and solo/ensemble performing skills.  

Composing: improvisation and accompaniment within a variety of genres and styles. Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features of improvisation in African, Chinese, Indian and Blues music. 

HALF TERM 6

Solo/Ensemble performance skills - To explore the elements of music (pitch, tempo, dynamics, duration, texture, timbre, articulation, silence) through solo and ensemble performance using a variety of notations.  

 

Pupils will also explore musical structure through listening, appraising and performing the solo and ensemble music from a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions.  

Performing: developing solo/ensemble performance skills on a variety of instruments  

Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features (musical elements and structures) from a range of historical periods, styles, genres and traditions.

HALF TERM 1

RECOVERY CURRICULUM:

Making Connections - Learning how improvisation is a common feature of diverse musical traditions and how there is a range of musical features and devices that support improvisation.  

 

This unit explores the ways in which improvisation, rhythmic and melodic, has remained a strong feature within a wide range of musical styles, genres and traditions. It also explores some interesting scale patterns through listening, improvising and performing activities. This unit focuses on: pitch (ragas, blues scale, pentatonic scale); rhythm (cycles and loops); and structure (Chinese, Indian and Blues structures).  

Performing: improvisation and solo/ensemble performing skills.  

Composing: improvisation and accompaniment within a variety of genres and styles. Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features of improvisation in African, Chinese, Indian and Blues music. 

HALF TERM 2

RECOVERY CURRICULUM  

Making Connections - Learning how improvisation is a common feature of diverse musical traditions and how there is a range of musical features and devices that support improvisation 

 

This unit explores the ways in which improvisation, rhythmic and melodic, has remained a strong feature within a wide range of musical styles, genres and traditions. It also explores some interesting scale patterns through listening, improvising and performing activities. This unit focuses on: pitch (ragas, blues scale, pentatonic scale); rhythm (cycles and loops); and structure (Chinese, Indian and Blues structures).  

Performing: improvisation and solo/ensemble performing skills.  

Composing: improvisation and accompaniment within a variety of genres and styles. Critical Engagement: appreciation of some of the key features of improvisation in African, Chinese, Indian and Blues music. 

HALF TERM 3

Reggae - Identifying, exploring and making creative use of musical devices found in reggae music. 

 

This unit explores: distinctive ‘fragmented’ but melodic bass-lines, often using intervals of a fourth/fifth; strongly rhythmic, and often syncopated, simple chord sequences, with the chords played on off beats. The main focus of this unit is rhythm: syncopation and off-beat. Pupils will also explore texture (recording layers on GarageBand), pitch (intervals of a fourth/fifth, treble clef, bass clef) and learn how to play new instruments (drums and bass guitar).  

 

Performing: vocal and instrumental parts in reggae music.  

Composing: making up riffs and bass lines that include features of reggae music; arranging musical ideas for group performance.  

Critical Engagement: explore the work of great Reggae composers, exploring key features and characteristics of the genre. 

HALF TERM 4

Film Music - Learning how music can enhance the visual images and dramatic impact of film, and can reflect the emotional and narrative messages of the drama. 

 

 This unit explores how film music: uses sound effects, background music and character motifs; can change the viewer’s interpretation of a scene; uses extended structures featuring continuity between contrasting scenes; refers to different musical styles. This unit focuses on how timbre, texture, dynamics, tempo, pitch and rhythm can be used in different ways to create sound effects, background music and character motifs. Structure is also an important focus, as sounds have to be linked to the events in a film.  

Critical Engagement: identifying how film music reflects the context in which it is used and draws on a variety of musical devices.  

Composing: creating a musical narrative for a film scene, using appropriate techniques. Performing: vocal and instrumental themes/leitmotifs from some of the great Film Music composers. 

HALF TERM 5

Going Solo - Developing pupils’ ability to understand the conventions of accompanied solo performance, and the interplay between the soloist and their accompaniment or backing, across a range of styles and genres. 

 

This unit explores: solo performance in different contexts; the interplay between soloist and accompanying musicians; and some of the musical structures that support solo performance. This unit focuses on: pitch (solo melodies and harmonic accompaniment); rhythms (performing in percussion ensembles); texture (the use of instrumentation to form accompaniments); structure (forms/structure that support the role of the soloist); and dynamics (the balance between solo performer and the accompaniment).  

Performing: pupils will develop ensemble skills as both soloists and accompanists, performing music from a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions.  

Composing: pupils will have opportunities to create their own solos above backing tracks and accompaniments, and to compose an extended piece in rondo form.  

Critical Engagement: pupils will develop an appreciation for the key features of solo/accompaniment roles through listening to a variety of extracts from a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions. 

HALF TERM 6

Going Solo - Developing pupils’ ability to understand the conventions of accompanied solo performance, and the interplay between the soloist and their accompaniment or backing, across a range of styles and genres. 

 

This unit explores: solo performance in different contexts; the interplay between soloist and accompanying musicians; and some of the musical structures that support solo performance. This unit focuses on: pitch (solo melodies and harmonic accompaniment); rhythms (performing in percussion ensembles); texture (the use of instrumentation to form accompaniments); structure (forms/structure that support the role of the soloist); and dynamics (the balance between solo performer and the accompaniment).  

Performing: pupils will develop ensemble skills as both soloists and accompanists, performing music from a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions.  

Composing: pupils will have opportunities to create their own solos above backing tracks and accompaniments, and to compose an extended piece in rondo form.  

Critical Engagement: pupils will develop an appreciation for the key features of solo/accompaniment roles through listening to a variety of extracts from a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions. 

HALF TERM 1

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry 

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities.  

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry 

HALF TERM 2

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry 

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities.  

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry 

HALF TERM 3

Unit 5: Introduction to Live Performance.

 

Have you ever thought about all of the things that need to happen before a concert? Having a career as a performer requires high levels of technical ability on an instrument or voice. In order to achieve high levels of technical proficiency, musicians need to be able to develop an appropriate discipline and perseverance. Musicians need to be able to perform both confidently and accurately to an audience with a level of expression and interpretation in their work. Over the course of this unit, you will explore skills and make decisions as you prepare for performance. Planning and practising are both vital parts of a successful performance; you should be aware of when your performances are due to take place so that you are able to plan your preparation time. You should be encouraged to choose your own pieces for performance to an audience. You should work with a specialist teacher to improve your technique and should keep a practice/production log that details how you have improved over the duration of the unit. If appropriate, you should organise your own accompaniment, whether this is a single accompanist or a band. You should practise and rehearse your chosen pieces so that you present polished performances. Some people find performing to an audience daunting. Therefore, you should be given plenty of opportunities to perform to audiences.  

 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A develop your music performance skills and review your own practice. 

B use your music performance skills within rehearsal and performance

HALF TERM 4

Unit 5: Introduction to Live Performance.

 

Have you ever thought about all of the things that need to happen before a concert? Having a career as a performer requires high levels of technical ability on an instrument or voice. In order to achieve high levels of technical proficiency, musicians need to be able to develop an appropriate discipline and perseverance. Musicians need to be able to perform both confidently and accurately to an audience with a level of expression and interpretation in their work. Over the course of this unit, you will explore skills and make decisions as you prepare for performance. Planning and practising are both vital parts of a successful performance; you should be aware of when your performances are due to take place so that you are able to plan your preparation time. You should be encouraged to choose your own pieces for performance to an audience. You should work with a specialist teacher to improve your technique and should keep a practice/production log that details how you have improved over the duration of the unit. If appropriate, you should organise your own accompaniment, whether this is a single accompanist or a band. You should practise and rehearse your chosen pieces so that you present polished performances. Some people find performing to an audience daunting. Therefore, you should be given plenty of opportunities to perform to audiences.  

 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A develop your music performance skills and review your own practice. 

B use your music performance skills within rehearsal and performance

HALF TERM 5

Unit 2: Introduction to Managing A Music Product.

 

This unit will enable you to manage the planning, delivery and promotion of a live concert. The success of your music product will rely heavily on the planning and development process. It is important that different types of audience are understood and successful promotion is able to effectively engage these audiences. Your research should introduce you to elements of industry practice. You will work in a defined role to apply the specialist skills, knowledge and understanding required for the aspect of the work for which you are responsible. For example, you could be a performer in a live concert. Whichever role you take, you must demonstrate appropriate planning skills for the creation of your product. Your planning will lead to the final delivery of your product and its presentation to others. You will be required to work with others as well as achieving your personal goals, ensuring the product reflects your work and the qualities you show. The music industry requires teamwork at all levels of operation and you must support others to achieve to their full potential. Your work will also include the promotion of the music product, reflecting the fact that the industry does not depend purely on what happens on stage, but also on what happens in the market place, in retail and in audience generation and engagement. 

 

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A Plan, develop and deliver a music product  

B Promote a music product  

C Review the management of a music product

HALF TERM 6

Unit 2: Introduction to Managing A Music Product.

 

This unit will enable you to manage the planning, delivery and promotion of a live concert. The success of your music product will rely heavily on the planning and development process. It is important that different types of audience are understood and successful promotion is able to effectively engage these audiences. Your research should introduce you to elements of industry practice. You will work in a defined role to apply the specialist skills, knowledge and understanding required for the aspect of the work for which you are responsible. For example, you could be a performer in a live concert. Whichever role you take, you must demonstrate appropriate planning skills for the creation of your product. Your planning will lead to the final delivery of your product and its presentation to others. You will be required to work with others as well as achieving your personal goals, ensuring the product reflects your work and the qualities you show. The music industry requires teamwork at all levels of operation and you must support others to achieve to their full potential. Your work will also include the promotion of the music product, reflecting the fact that the industry does not depend purely on what happens on stage, but also on what happens in the market place, in retail and in audience generation and engagement. 

 

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A Plan, develop and deliver a music product  

B Promote a music product  

C Review the management of a music product

HALF TERM 1

RECOVERY CURRICULUM:  

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry 

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities.  

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry 

HALF TERM 2

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry 

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities.   

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry 

HALF TERM 3

Unit 2 : Managing A Music Product 

 

This unit will enable you to manage the planning, delivery and promotion of a live concert. The success of your music product will rely heavily on the planning and development process. It is important that different types of audience are understood and successful promotion is able to effectively engage these audiences. Your research should introduce you to elements of industry practice. You will work in a defined role to apply the specialist skills, knowledge and understanding required for the aspect of the work for which you are responsible. For example, you could be a performer in a live concert. Whichever role you take, you must demonstrate appropriate planning skills for the creation of your product. Your planning will lead to the final delivery of your product and its presentation to others. You will be required to work with others as well as achieving your personal goals, ensuring the product reflects your work and the qualities you show. The music industry requires teamwork at all levels of operation and you must support others to achieve to their full potential. Your work will also include the promotion of the music product, reflecting the fact that the industry does not depend purely on what happens on stage, but also on what happens in the market place, in retail and in audience generation and engagement. 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A Plan, develop and deliver a music product  

B Promote a music product  

C Review the management of a music product 

HALF TERM 4

Unit 2 : Managing A Music Product 

 

 This unit will enable you to manage the planning, delivery and promotion of a live concert. The success of your music product will rely heavily on the planning and development process. It is important that different types of audience are understood and successful promotion is able to effectively engage these audiences. Your research should introduce you to elements of industry practice. You will work in a defined role to apply the specialist skills, knowledge and understanding required for the aspect of the work for which you are responsible. For example, you could be a performer in a live concert. Whichever role you take, you must demonstrate appropriate planning skills for the creation of your product. Your planning will lead to the final delivery of your product and its presentation to others. You will be required to work with others as well as achieving your personal goals, ensuring the product reflects your work and the qualities you show. The music industry requires teamwork at all levels of operation and you must support others to achieve to their full potential. Your work will also include the promotion of the music product, reflecting the fact that the industry does not depend purely on what happens on stage, but also on what happens in the market place, in retail and in audience generation and engagement.  

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A Plan, develop and deliver a music product  

B Promote a music product  

C Review the management of a music product 

HALF TERM 5

Unit 5: Introduction to Live Performance. 

 

Have you ever thought about all of the things that need to happen before a concert? Having a career as a performer requires high levels of technical ability on an instrument or voice. In order to achieve high levels of technical proficiency, musicians need to be able to develop an appropriate discipline and perseverance. Musicians need to be able to perform both confidently and accurately to an audience with a level of expression and interpretation in their work. Over the course of this unit, you will explore skills and make decisions as you prepare for performance. Planning and practising are both vital parts of a successful performance; you should be aware of when your performances are due to take place so that you are able to plan your preparation time. You should be encouraged to choose your own pieces for performance to an audience. You should work with a specialist teacher to improve your technique and should keep a practice/production log that details how you have improved over the duration of the unit. If appropriate, you should organise your own accompaniment, whether this is a single accompanist or a band. You should practise and rehearse your chosen pieces so that you present polished performances. Some people find performing to an audience daunting. Therefore, you should be given plenty of opportunities to perform to audiences.  

 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A develop your music performance skills and review your own practice. 

B use your music performance skills within rehearsal and performance. 

HALF TERM 6

Unit 5: Introduction to Live Performance.

 

Have you ever thought about all of the things that need to happen before a concert? Having a career as a performer requires high levels of technical ability on an instrument or voice. In order to achieve high levels of technical proficiency, musicians need to be able to develop an appropriate discipline and perseverance. Musicians need to be able to perform both confidently and accurately to an audience with a level of expression and interpretation in their work. Over the course of this unit, you will explore skills and make decisions as you prepare for performance. Planning and practising are both vital parts of a successful performance; you should be aware of when your performances are due to take place so that you are able to plan your preparation time. You should be encouraged to choose your own pieces for performance to an audience. You should work with a specialist teacher to improve your technique and should keep a practice/production log that details how you have improved over the duration of the unit. If appropriate, you should organise your own accompaniment, whether this is a single accompanist or a band. You should practise and rehearse your chosen pieces so that you present polished performances. Some people find performing to an audience daunting. Therefore, you should be given plenty of opportunities to perform to audiences.  

 

Learning aims:  

In this unit you will:  

A develop your music performance skills and review your own practice. 

B use your music performance skills within rehearsal and performance. 

HALF TERM 1

RECOVERY CURRICULUM 

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry- External Exam Preparation 

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities. 

 

Learning aims:

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry

HALF TERM 2

Unit 1: Working in The Music Industry- External Exam Preparation  

 

The music industry may appear to be led and dominated by just a few massive multinational companies, and all-powerful impresarios who hold careers and contracts in the palm of their hand. But that is only half of the picture. The music industry relies on countless individuals, small industries, partnerships, local agencies and promoters who make the world of music a true industry. It includes different types of performance venue, organisations that create music products such as recordings or live shows, companies whose work involves arts administration (such as funding bodies) and businesses providing services such as transport and equipment hire. This unit will allow you to gain a good understanding of the scope of the music industry with a view to getting work in and using the organisations that exist. You will investigate music organisations to find out about the work they do and how they relate to and rely on one another. You will also be given the opportunity to find out about the people who work in these organisations, from performers to people who work in technical, production and administrative roles. If you wish to work in the music sector or intend to progress to higher qualification levels, you will need to understand the various business practices within the industry and the range of job opportunities that exist. You will also need to understand how the industry operates for the individual entrepreneurs, sole traders, partnerships and small organisations that predominate. This unit aims to help you gain awareness and the underpinning knowledge of the structure of the music industry, its working practices and opportunities.  

 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A Understand different types of organisations that make up the music industry  

B Understand job roles in the music industry 

HALF TERM 3

Unit 5: Introduction to Live Performance. 

 

Having a career as a performer requires high levels of technical ability on an instrument or voice. In order to achieve high levels of technical proficiency, musicians need to be able to develop an appropriate discipline and perseverance. Musicians need to be able to perform both confidently and accurately to an audience with a level of expression and interpretation in their work. Over the course of this unit, you will explore skills and make decisions as you prepare for performance. Planning and practising are both vital parts of a successful performance; you should be aware of when your performances are due to take place so that you are able to plan your preparation time. You should be encouraged to choose your own pieces for performance to an audience. You should work with a specialist teacher to improve your technique and should keep a practice/production log that details how you have improved over the duration of the unit. If appropriate, you should organise your own accompaniment, whether this is a single accompanist or a band. You should practise and rehearse your chosen pieces so that you present polished performances. Some people find performing to an audience daunting. Therefore, you should be given plenty of opportunities to perform to audiences.  

 

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A develop your music performance skills and review your own practice. 

B use your music performance skills within rehearsal and performance. 

HALF TERM 4

Unit 3: Introduction to Live Sound 

 

Live sound is the heart of the music industry. The sound engineer’s role is key to its success and is a rewarding and challenging career path.  

This unit offers you the opportunity to learn about live sound and carry out the role of a live sound engineer. As a sound engineer, you must be able to manage the technical requirements for an entire concert, such as festivals, concerts, shows, gigs, school events, charity fundraisers, open air events, theatre and small venue events. You will begin by considering the sound requirements of the venue. You must ensure that there is sufficient amplification for the audience to enjoy the performance without exceeding safe sound limits. You must organise and direct sound checks and you must know how to use and operate equipment safely without causing injury to yourself or others. During performances you will mix sound signals together from a variety of sources in real time to give the audience a balanced sound. Many of the tasks in live sound are the same as in a recording studio, but you must be aware that the environment is likely to change and the mix will need constant reviewing and adjustment. The sound engineer must be able to adapt and respond to technical problems in performance and ensure that minimal disruption to the event occurs. Finally, you will de-rig at the end of the show and ensure that all equipment is checked and stored safely. You will be the first to arrive and the last to leave as the success of a live music event relies heavily on a skilled and attentive sound engineer.  

  

Learning aims: 

In this unit you will:  

A plan for a live music event  

B demonstrate understanding of health and safety  

C set up and use live music systems. 

HALF TERM 5

Unit 3: Introduction to Live Sound 

 

Live sound is the heart of the music industry. The sound engineer’s role is key to its success and is a rewarding and challenging career path.  

This unit offers you the opportunity to learn about live sound and carry out the role of a live sound engineer. As a sound engineer, you must be able to manage the technical requirements for an entire concert, such as festivals, concerts, shows, gigs, school events, charity fundraisers, open air events, theatre and small venue events. You will begin by considering the sound requirements of the venue. You must ensure that there is sufficient amplification for the audience to enjoy the performance without exceeding safe sound limits. You must organise and direct sound checks and you must know how to use and operate equipment safely without causing injury to yourself or others. During performances you will mix sound signals together from a variety of sources in real time to give the audience a balanced sound. Many of the tasks in live sound are the same as in a recording studio, but you must be aware that the environment is likely to change and the mix will need constant reviewing and adjustment. The sound engineer must be able to adapt and respond to technical problems in performance and ensure that minimal disruption to the event occurs. Finally, you will de-rig at the end of the show and ensure that all equipment is checked and stored safely. You will be the first to arrive and the last to leave as the success of a live music event relies heavily on a skilled and attentive sound engineer.  

  

Learning aims 

In this unit you will:  

A plan for a live music event  

B demonstrate understanding of health and safety  

C set up and use live music systems. 

HALF TERM 6